Opinion

ADHD and osteopathy/manual therapy – what can be done

Lately I’ve had a few people asking me my opinion as a health professional (osteopath) about ADHD and osteopathy.

First off research – well in regards to research about Osteopathy and ADHD there is a study released in 2014:

Effect of Osteopathic Manipulative Therapy in the Attentive Performance of Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

This is research done with a relatively small group in Italy (28 children aged 5-15) and divided into two groups – one who received conventional care, and one who received conventional care and Osteopathic manual therapy.  Those who had the manual therapy did have improvements in outcomes testing for Biancardi-Stroppa Modified Bell Cancellation Test.  This is a test that looks at the ability of a child to find certain shapes and ignore background or distracting information.

Overall the research suggested further study would be a good idea – increasing the number of children involved in the study.  It it also noted that this research is performed in Italy, and while treatment may be of a similar nature, I could not verify if the techniques used would of been similar to that in Australia.

So research is very limited in its opinion of osteopathy in Australia and how it can help with ADHD.  With the AHPRA regulations for Osteopaths in Australia that means it is not allowable to advertise that Osteopathy can help with ADHD.

However People/children with ADHD get tight and sore muscles much the same as anybody else and that is something that osteopathy may be helpful for.  Having fallen down off a trampoline, or tripped while running, or any other number of injuries can result in muscular sprains and strains that may benefit from the attention of an osteopath (such as Luke at Good Health Osteopathy in Diamond Creek).

Other considerations:

Other things to consider can be other factors which may affect ADHD.

  1. Diet and Gut Microbiome: There are pretty definitive links between Autism Spectrum and Changes to Gut Microbiome (balance of different bacteria’s inside the digestive tract), and as of yet it has not been shown in those with ADHD.  What is known however, that those with ADHD are almost 3 times more likely to suffer from constipation, and those born via C-section have slightly increased likelyhood of having ADHD later on in life.  Both of those would likely indicate an increased chance of having gut dysbiosis.
  2. Retained ‘primitive reflexes’:  There is a neonatal/baby reflex known as the galant reflex that you will see in babies usually up to about 6 months.  This is a reflex believed to help with birth and to help establish hip mobility and crawling patterns.  At times this reflex can be retained until later on into childhood and even adulthood.  This study found higher levels of retained reflex in children with ADHD, and other research has linked this retained reflex to higher levels of children bed wetting over the age of 5.

For those wanting to be more proactive in managing an individual with ADHD there are exercise and advice that could be given to potentially help with the above two points.

Dr. Luke Richter (Osteopath) and Angie Richter (Massage)
329-347 Diamond Creek Road, Diamond Creek 3089
0434001370
 
Providing massage and osteopathic treatment for those in Diamond Creek, Greensborough, Eltham, Hurstbridge and surrounding suburbs.

 

Opinion

Should I use a foam roller

I’ve been getting more people ask if they should use a foam roller and given the growing popularity, I thought it worthwhile discussing weather you might need one or not.

First off. Foam rolling is a form of releasing muscles that people have been doing for thousands of years. It essentially works out to being quite similar to if you get a massage, osteopathic treatment or other form of muscular release.  The fancy term for it is a myofascial release.  This means you are releasing the muscles and fascia (a type of connective tissue).  You are also influencing the circulatory and nervous systems.

The technical side of things: there are 4 types of mechanoreceptors in fascia – Golgi, Pacini, Ruffini and Interstitial.  Golgi receptors typically respond most to strong stretch, pacini to rapid changes in pressures and vibration, Ruffini to sustained pressure and lateral stretch and Interstitial which are stimulated by both rapid changes to pressure and sustained pressure.  It is the stimulation of these receptors with foam rolling that will release and relax the muscle

  1. Do I need a Foam Roller

No, Definitely not.  Though a foam roller may make it easier for you to achieve your goals, the ultimate goal is pressure and movement on the muscles in a controlled and consistent way.  Some people may use golf or tennis balls to achieve the same goals.  I’ve had clients come in to see me as an osteopath in Diamond creek who haven’t wanted to buy a foam roller and instead used a wooden rolling pin from their kitchen.  One individual who was limited in movement and had a walking stick as a mobility aid used the walking stick while sitting down and watching TV.  Use your imagination (and common sense) if you want to get started but don’t want to buy a foam roller.

What i will say though, is that a medium density foam roller can be very good for certain areas of the body where you don’t want as much pressure.  The firm rollers with spikes/knobs can be much to sore for many.

2. How much pressure should i use

How much pressure do you like with a massage?  As i mentioned before foam rolling will affect the nervous system, if your body feels under attack (like the first time you roll out the outside of your leg/ITB’s) it will likely tighten up and you won’t get as much benefit.  You will also increase the chance of pulling up quite tender afterwards.

If you feel like using it on the floor with your body weight is too much pressure, try doing it against a wall, or if you have a willing helper, lie down and get them to move the foam roller over you.

3. How long should I do it for

Typically I recommend doing each region or muscle group for approximately 30-60 seconds.  However if you have a spot that is especially tight/knotted, or you are trying to achieve specific goals with that region, you can roll for about 2-3 minutes.

4. Can I use my foam roller for other things

Aside from using it to have roller fights with your friends, there are a few alternative uses for it (depending on size, density etc).

  • Lying the roller on the floor and standing on it, can be a great way to work on your proprioception and balance.  This of course won’t work for the cheaper rollers with a hollow core (trust me they break).
  • As mentioned, you can get a family member or friend to roll out your muscles for you. This is particularly helpful in hard to roll places such as your lats (latissimus dorsi is your main arm abductor, and can be rolled out on the outside/back of your rib cage).

If unsure you can talk to a trusted health professional such as an osteopath, or other professionals who have an interest in these types of things like a massage therapist (Angie at Good Health Osteopathy Diamond Creek is excellent), personal trainer or physiotherapist etc.

 

Good Health Osteopathy Diamond Creek
Dr. Luke Richter (Osteopath) and Angie Richter (Massage)
329-347 Diamond Creek Road, Diamond Creek 3089
0434001370
 
Providing massage and osteopathic treatment for those in Diamond Creek, Greensborough, Eltham, Hurstbridge and surrounding suburbs.

 

Opinion

Babies and flat sports

Here at Good Health Osteopathy Diamond Creek, I see a range of different patients from varying ages and conditions.  A common reason for parents to bring young babies in for assessment and treatment is the appearance of a Flat spot, or the head not being symmetrical.

Amy Leung recently wrote an article on it which gives a bit more information about it  Babies and Flat spots.

I feel the benefits of Osteopathic treatment can be many.

First, it provides another point of contact for someone in the health industry to ask questions about your child.  Some questions are best answered by your maternal health nurse, and others your GP, but some can be answered at a consultation.

Second, a thorough assessment of your child, looking for areas of tightness or restriction.  With training and experience, I can identify which areas are likely ‘niggles’ and typically resolve as your child ages, and which ones are atypical and (in my opinion) would benefit treatment through gentle massage, stretching and other indirect techniques.

Finally, general advice.  As part of my osteopathic course, and with additional training after graduating (combined with having a young child of my own). I may be able to offer suggestions or tips which may help with your child.

So if you are looking for an osteopath in Diamond Creek, near Greensborough, St. Helena, Yarrambat and Eltham. Please feel free to call on 0434001470 or email at goodhealthosteo@gmail.com to discuss how i might be able to help your child.

Dr. Luke Richter (Osteopath)

Good Health Osteopathy Diamond Creek

5B 329-347 Diamond Creek Rd, Diamond Creek

Commonly servicing: Diamond Creek, Greensborough, Eltham, Hurstbridge

Opinion

Waking up with a sore neck? ‘Tis the Season

Its that time of year again. Christmas parties, Christmas with the family, New years eve, holidays from work, and if you’re lucky -going away, be it on holidays, camping or visiting friends. The normal routine goes out the window, exercise gets cut back at the same time as a few more social drinks and some late nights.

Its great to relax and recharge your batteries, your body needs it. An unfortunate side effect of all these changes however can be waking up with a sore neck, or even some headaches. Its not surprising with such a big change to the routine.

What can you do about it?

Well, as an osteopath – one great thing you could do is get it treated! Having a qualified professional assess your posture, loosen off those tight muscles and joints and give you some exercises is a great way to take care of yourself. You often don’t realise how good you can feel until after you get some treatment. At Good Health Osteopathy, I am often seeing patients from Greensborough, Diamond Creek, Eltham and surround suburbs.

Alternatively, there are some things you can be doing at home:

  • Getting good quality sleep. Its been said that time is a great healer, well typically so is sleep!
  • Drinking plenty of water. Everyone is different to how much water they ‘need’ to function, but typically most will admit to not drinking enough. You wouldn’t run your car without oil, so why would you expect your body to perform well without water.
  • Heat – getting some warmth into your neck can feel great – some with hot showers, others with heat wheat bags they may have at home.
  • Don’t forget the front of your neck. One of the biggest things I see is that people will poke and loosen up their shoulders, but not consider the muscles in the front of the neck. If you aren’t certain what to do, it is best discussing it with a qualified practitioner before you start poking in the front of your neck, there are some pretty important nerves and arteries in the area.

Book Online now!

Dr. Luke Richter (Osteopath)

Good Health Osteopathy

5B 329-347 Diamond Creek Rd, Diamond Creek

Commonly servicing: Diamond Creek, Greensborough, Eltham, Hurstbridge

Opinion

What should I tell my Osteopath?

I’ve noticed over the years that many patients have layers of information they will share with me as their treating osteopath.  These layers come in many different forms.  Sometimes I get told the basics but nothing more due to a lack of trust, or a feeling that it may be boring, or that it is unrelated to my patients current problem.  Sometimes they don’t mention it because they’ve asked their General Practitioner (GP) and not gotten an answer so have just given up on getting it fixed.

I personally believe that more information is better.  The more I get told, the more likely I am to be able to help with any given problem.

For example:

Recently I’ve had a patient with ongoing back pain which had been helped with previous treatment but never 100% fixed.  I admit that I had seen her a few times myself with similar results.  One treatment It was revealed that this patient had a bloating sensation for as long as the back pain had lasted.  Using that information I was able to ease the tension through the abdomen with visceral techniques and now this patient is better.  No more back pain, no more bloating.

I admit it doesn’t always work out that way, bloating and most abdominal symptoms can be as a result of allergies, intolerances and conditions that aren’t fixable by hands-on work.  But sometimes they are caused by tightness in the structures of the stomach and are relieved with treatment.  This is just an example, there are many things i see on a weekly basis that patients are suprised I can assist with.

Osteopaths are put through 5 years of university training which includes a great deal of anatomy, physiology, pathology, clinical diagnosis and much more.  You are often able to spend more time with your osteopath than you are with your General Practitioner.  Please feel free to mention any concerns you may have even if you don’t feel it relates to your headache/back pain/knee pain.  You might not get the answer you need every time but I have found in the past I can often explain and help patients better understand what is going on in their bodies.

Dr. Luke Richter (osteopath)

Good Health Osteopathy

5B 329 – 347 Diamond Creek Road

Diamond Creek

Opinion

Osteopathic Maintenance treatment in Greensborough, Eltham and surrounds

I often tell patients that the human body is an amazing machine.  It really is when you start to consider how we manage to co-ordinate all of our muscles together to be able to get out of bed in the morning (most days), how we extract energy from the food we eat, how we can usually convince our bodies with determination, training and perseverance to do almost anything we need it to do.  No one is bulletproof though, and no machine can do everything without fail.

If you treat your body like a machine, you begin to realise that all machines will need a service from time to time.  Take your car for example.  Theoretically we all service our cars about twice a year.  It needs to have the oil changed, and to have everything checked over to try and prevent any serious mechanical malfunction.  A maintenance treatment is much the same- a general check up before you get seriously injured.  Much like a car service, it doesn’t guarantee you’ll never have a problem.  But in my opinion, it does reduce the risk.

If you are anything like me, sometimes that car doesn’t get serviced exactly every six months.  What happens if you are overdue for your maintenance service.  Typically nothing, but if you keep missing them, you increase the risk of a major problem.  Our bodies even have warning lights, much like our cars.  Pain.  When you start to feel pain, its your bodies way of telling you that there is a problem that needs to be resolved.  Sometimes you can resolve it yourself, with stretching and exercises.  But sometimes it needs the help of a therapist, such as an osteopath to help keep things moving well.

To keep flogging the car analogy, if you were to decide to take your typical commuter car that you drive from St. Helena, Eltham, Diamond Creek etc to the city each day and take it out to race on a track on weekends, you would need to service your car more frequently.   Much the same with your body, if you decide to start running, going to the gym or generally increasing the physical demands on your body – there is going to be a higher demand for maintenance treatment to minimise the risk of injury.

Every body is different, so there is not set period of time for maintenance treatment.  Some people come in every six months, while others have a history of past injuries and might need some work every six weeks or so.  It comes down to the individual.

If you want to discuss anything written feel free to contact Good Health Osteopathy Diamond Creek

Dr. Luke Richter (osteopath)

Good Health Osteopathy

5B 329-347 Diamond Creek Road,

Diamond Creek

Good Health Osteopathy – Quality health care commonly servicing patients from Diamond Creek, Greensborough, Eltham, St. Helena, Yarrambat.

Opinion

Travelling and stretching

As an Osteopath, I am quite fond of giving my patients stretches and exercises to do in order to better manage their back/neck/knee/relevant region of the body.

I sometimes find I have patients returning after an absence of treatment (anywhere between weeks and years) saying that their problem has ‘returned’.  Sometimes I get told it just came back, or sometimes it can be because of a trip away or ‘sleeping funny’.

At this time I tend to ask, “have you been doing your stretches?” to which the typical response is I did them for a few weeks and then I forgot.  From my patients my own personal experience, I can understand it is difficult to continue doing any form of stretches or exercises on an ongoing basis.

Life gets busy, Routines change, people forget.

My personal belief is to do the best that you can.  Now for some people, people more motivated to me who get more relief from their stretching – the best they can is stretching daily.  I applaud them and encourage as many people as possible to stretch daily.  For me and many other people, its about stretching when you can and using whatever memory aid you can to remind yourself.  For some its every time they sit at a computer, or every time they watch TV, or wash the dishes.  For me its lying in bed at night, if I move and I feel stiff – I stretch as much as I can manage.  Its usually about twice a week.

The other thing I see frequently is that patients sometimes believe if they’ve stopped stretching for a few weeks there is ‘no point’ to starting again and things have gotten tight already.  My number one tip about stretching is that

If you know you are going to be stressed, travelling or loading up an injured area – stretch daily for 3 days before and 2-3 days afterwards.

 

My logic is that this will help relax the muscles so that when you inevitably ‘sleep funny’ or overload your body the nice stretches you’ve been doing to lead up to the trauma will minimise your chances of injury!

Recently I had a trip to Tasmania  – slept on a very uncomfortable pillow and bed, and woke up with a pinch in my neck.  I truly believe that my stretching before and after this is what caused this pinch to be a minor discomfort and not a big injury.  That and keeping fit and healthy which is a topic for another day.

If you don’t know any stretches for your injury, perhaps its time for a treatment to manage your pain better and get some stretches while your at it

Dr. Luke Richter (osteopath)

Good Health Osteopathy

5B 329-347 Diamond Creek Road,

Diamond Creek

Opinion

Getting settled in Diamond Creek

So I’ve decided to start a blog for my Osteopathic Clinic Good Health Osteopathy in Diamond Creek Melbourne, to help add content to my website and information that I feel might be useful.  At this stage it may included stretching and exercise information.  Perhaps some video blogs on changes at the clinic may be coming through the pipeline  I’ve been working in Rosanna for about 12-18 months now and loving the new outlook out at Diamond Creek

20130121_113328

Dr. Luke Richter (Osteopath)

5B 329-347 Diamond Creek Road, Diamond Creek